Monday, May 2, 2011

Trivet Tutorial


My friend Janet Platt is very creative and designed the popular Quick Points Ruler. The most recent ruler that she's designed is the Scallop Ruler (see picture below). If you are going to the local HMQS Show in Utah on May 5-7, 2011 you will be able to purchase the rulers at the show and even watch a demonstration. Go to the HMQS link to print a coupon. Janet and her RULERS will also be at the International Spring Quilt Market May 13-15, 2011 at the Salt Palace in Salt Lake City, Utah.



It wasn't too long ago that she asked me to design a project for a kitchen trivet using the leftover mylar from making the Scallop Pushers (see picture below). That started my mind going and I told her I would take on the challenge. It was fun designing the kitchen trivet and it can also be a circular placemat to place on your side table or under a plate.




Scalloped Trivet Tutorial

Finished Size: 15" diameter Circle

Supplies:
  • 1" Scallop Ruler-S1
  • 1" Scallop Pusher-P1
  • 12 .5" x 6.5" Creative Grid Ruler
  • One 4" x 4" Fabric Square for Center Square
  • Two 4" x 4" Fabric Squares for next SQS
  • Two 6.5" x 6.5" Fabric Squares for next SQS
  • Two Fabric strips measuring 3.5" x 7.5" for border on SQS block
  • Two Fabric strips measuring 3.5" x 13.5" for border on SQS block
  • Two pieces of Fabric measuring 8.5" x 9.25" for pocket on back of trivet
  • One piece of Fabric measuring 4" x WOF for scallop
  • One piece of Contrasting Fabric measuring 4" x 40-44" for scallop
  • Insul-Bright Batting measuring 14" x 14"
  • Trivet Backing Fabric measuring 14" x 14"
  • Teflon Insert for Trivet available through www.quickpointsruler.com
  • Freezer Paper
SQS= Square in a Square
WOF= Width of Fabric

Instructions:

Step One:
Making the Scallop

Completely read the instructions before using the Scallop Ruler.

Use the two 4” x WOF strips to make the scalloped edge for the trivet.

Lay the ruler on the wrong side of the fabric and trace around the ruler and in all of the holes.

Slide the ruler across the fabric to finish marking the strip.


Reduce your stitch length to a shorter stitch (2.0) then sew 1/4 inch in from the marked line. Stop at the dot keeping needle in down position, then pivot the fabric, take one stitch, pivot again and continue sewing the scallops.

Repeat process for each scallop.


Clip the curves and into the deep valleys. You could also use Pinking Shears.


To open the scallop for turning you will need to carefully cut down the center of one side of the scallop being careful not to cut the fabric underneath. I folded the scallop then gave it a bit of steam so that I could cut along the pressed fold (see below).


Press the scallops using the scallop pusher. The pusher is a very useful tool and will decrease your pressing time. Set Scallop aside for later.



Step Two:
Making the Square in a Square Block for Trivet

Cut fabric according to the supply list above. This is a picture of what you will need to make the Square in a Square Block (SQS).


Take your 4" x 4" center square and fold it in half then pinch the folds. Repeat for opposite side of square.

Take the (2) 4" x 4" squares for the SQS and cut them diagonally from the bottom right corner up to the top left corner. You will now have 4 triangles. Now take the two corners along the diagonally cut line and bring them together to form a fold then pinch the fold. This is a quick and easy way to match the center of the triangles to the center of the squares.


Now take two of the triangles and match the pinched centers with the center marks on the two opposite sides of the center square.

Using a 1/4" seam allowance sew the triangle on one side of the square and then the opposite side. Press seams away from center squares. Repeat process for the two remaining sides of the square.


Take the creative grid ruler and match the 45 degree markings on the ruler and match it to one of the 4 corners of the square. The ruler is set up to leave a 1/4" seam allowance beyond the squares corner point. Trim the excess fabric. Repeat this process for the remaining 3 corners of the SQS Block.


The Square in a Square Block should now measure 5.5" x 5.5" after trimming the excess.



Now take the (2) 6.5" x 6.5" squares for the next SQS and cut them diagonally from the bottom right corner up to the top left corner. You will now have 4 triangles. Take the two corners of the triangle (along the diagonally cut line) then bring them together to form a fold then pinch the fold.

Now take two of these triangles and match the pinched centers with the corners of the center squares. Using a 1/4" seam allowance sew the triangle on one side of the square and then the opposite side. Press seams away from center squares. Repeat process for the two remaining sides of the square.

Take the creative grid ruler and lay the 45 degree markings on the ruler and match it to one of the 4 corners of the square. The ruler is set up to leave a 1/4" seam allowance beyond the squares corner point. Trim the excess fabric. Repeat this process for the remaining 3 corners of the SQS Block.


The Square in a Square Block should now measure 7.5" x 7.5" after trimming excess.


Sew on the 3.5" x 7.5" strips to each side of SQS. Press seams outward.

Sew on the 3.5" x 13.5" strips to the remaining sides of SQS. Press seams outward. Your block is now ready to cut out and quilt. Set aside. Your block is now ready to cut into a circle.


Pull out freezer paper and draw a circle using an 11.75" diameter circle (I used one of my dinner plates but, know that it’s NOT the plate you see in the pictures). Cut out the freezer paper circle and fold it in half twice. Now iron it to the right side of SQS block making sure the creased lines in the freezer paper cross over the four corners of the SQS block.


The circle should now be evenly centered in the block.


Cut off the fabric that remains outside of the freezer paper circle.



Cut out one more fabric circle for trivet backing fabric and one more circle out of the batting.



Step Three:
Quilting the SQS Trivet Top

Now place the finished Trivet on top of the batting. Pin in place and quilt as desired. I stitched in the ditch and sewed circles around the outside edge of trivet. I finished sewing four diagonal lines across the SQS block creating x’s.


Below is a view of the quilting on the back.



Step Four:
Making the Pocket for Trivet Back

For the (optional) pocket on the back of the trivet, take two pieces of fabric measuring 8.5" x 9.25" with right sides together place on top of the Insul-Bright batting. Pin.

Sew around all 4 sides leaving a 2” opening for turning the pocket right side out. Clip corners, turn, and press.


Take the pocket you just finished and center it in the middle of the fabric circle being used for the back of the trivet. Sew a seam close to the edge of 3 sides of the pocket making sure the 2” opening is sewn closed as you sew the three sides. Set Aside.

The picture shows the finished product with the heat resistant Teflon that slips into the pocket for added protection. Trim the Teflon to fit the pocket.



Step Five:
Finishing the Scalloped Trivet

Before sandwiching all of the layers you will need to take the finished scallop and sew a basting stitch along the bottom folded edge of the scallop.


Pull the thread to gather the scallop just enough to ease it around the outside edge of the trivet. Adjust the scallop then pin in place.


Sew the scallop in place. Then sandwich the two circles with right sides together. Pin. Make sure to use a walking foot on your sewing machine to sew the layers together. Make sure to leave a 2-3” opening for turning the trivet.

Clip curves around the circle starting and ending at the opening. Turn Trivet right side out. Press and sew opening closed.



Here's a video showing you how to use the Scallop Ruler.

12 comments:

Fiesta said...

Wow!!!! This is beautiful.

Material Mary said...

Kim, that trivet is just adorable and I loved learning about these new rulers. Thanks for sharing.
Mary

Jo-Anne said...

That is so cute! The fabric is adorable.
Hope all is well. :)
oxox
Jo-Anne

P.S. It looks like we will be turning down that job offer we talked about at Makenzie's wedding. We would be taking a step back finacially if we did...we just didn't feel good about it. Just wanted to let you know.

Q said...

What a gorgeous trivet! I love the colours, am going to have to wait till I get home to have a good peek at the rulers and how to use them, but I would love to make some!

Nanette Merrill and daughters said...

I have a project I want to make with these. This is a great tutorial. When will I get to it? I don't know but I love what you've done. It is beautiful.

Cathie said...

Love your pattern for this nifty new gadget. I missed the vendor mall at HMQS (only had time to check out all of the beautiful quilts) so I am glad you shared your find!

Madame Samm said...

HI, this would be a perfect share for stash...yes I fancy this...and you can highlight some of your new patterns..

VickiT said...

Adorable pattern. MUST have that scallop ruler and the pushers too. Those are too cool.

Thank you so much.

Rae Ann said...

Kim... I love this... Great Job!

Maggi said...

Your tutorial is great. I'm going to do one for myself too : )
Maggi

Jannel said...

I love how your iron pops up when not in use. What kind of iron is that? Jannel

Ida M. Glazier said...

Wow!! We , my sister and I, just was shown this scallop ruler at the quilt shop in our area, and bought it on the spot!!! Its wonderful! What a cool techneque, and so beautiful, too. How Clever! We love it and love your blog! Both new quilters, and having a ball. Thanks.